Resident Research

Research is an important part of the residency program at UTHSCSA Department of Orthopaedics. Each resident is required to complete a publishable research project by the end of their fourth year.  A well structured format, designed by the Orthopaedic Resident Research Committee (ORRC), is in place to ensure a positive and productive outcome. Opportunities are available for basic and clinical science topics as well as quality improvement and potential safety issues. It is our hope that the resident will gain an understanding of the research process from doing a project. Our goals are for the resident to learn and be comfortable with the research process, to be able to critically evaluate available literature, to understand how to practice evidence based medicine, and to apply findings to their clinical practice.

Residents participate in a two month Research and Basic Science Rotation during their second year.  During the rotation, the resident identifies a project that he/she will complete under the direction and mentorship of a faculty member during his/her residency. The project must address a previously unanswered question and be publishable in a peer-reviewed scientific format. At the conclusion of the rotation, the resident is required to present a description of his/her project using Microsoft PowerPoint. The presentation is to demonstrate not only a command of PowerPoint, but an understanding of the relevant literature, the scientific method (using an hypothesis-driven approach), the appropriate tools or methods for collecting data and statistically assessing the results, and the costs for materials and other expenses to complete the project. 

During the Research Rotation (PGY2), individualized instruction is supplemented with reading materials designed to introduce the resident to evidence-based medicine, the scientific literature, and PowerPoint (User’s Guides to the Medical Literature. Essentials of Evidence Based Clinical Practice by G. Guyatt and D. Rennie, AMA Press, 2002; How to Read a Paper: The Basics of Evidence Based Medicine by T. Greenhalgh, BMJ Books, 2001; Evidence Based Medicine: How to Practice and Teach EBM by D.L. Sackett, S.E. Straus, W.S. Richardson, W. Rosenberg, and R.B. Haynes, Churchill Livingston, 2000; Where’s the Evidence? Debates in Modern Medicine by W.A. Silverman, Oxford University Press, 1998; Power Point 2000 by K. Murray, Sybex, 1999).

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